Monday, August 18, 2014

Jersey

I had a brain fart the other day, thinking I hadn't told you about Jersey, but of course I had! She's fitting in great...


What a sweet little pig! She has a sunny personality and is just such a nice addition to the barn. We've completely integrated her now and things are going very well, although she likes to go back to her own pen to sleep at night. I'm hoping that soon she'll be sleeping with the rest of the herd as well.


She's very curious about all the birds, including the guinea fowl!


And here's a gratuitous shot of Button. All our pigs are filthy! I'm looking forward to getting them into their new fenced, grassy pasture, but we're waiting for their new little pen to be constructed.

Happy Monday. I have to go take 13 honey supers off my hives. My friend helped me bottle 500 lbs of honey on Saturday morning. It's going to be a banner honey year. Last week I added my 65th medium honey super (box full of frames that the bees fill with honey for me) of the season. One of these supers contains 35 - 40 lbs of honey when full. Multiply that by 35... holy honey bee!!

21 comments:

  1. OK, bring on the Honey. To bad we are living here in Germany. You are showing way to much piggys, you are tempting me to get out the old frying pen.:-)

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  2. I got curious, so I just looked it up: yes, a group of pigs is a herd, but a bunch of piglets could be a "farrow" and a group of wild pigs a "sounder." Cool, huh?
    I've been on this kick ever since I found out a bunch of porcupines is a "prickle."
    What a fascinating things to farm - bees. One of the few forms of livestock you don't have to feed!

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    1. I love those collective names for animals.

      And I do feed my bees in spring and fall... supplementary sugar syrup! :)

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  3. Just remember: a dirty pig is a happy pig! How cute Jersey is fascinated by the birds.

    Your bees obviously find plenty for their honey. It's good to hear they are doing well. So many hives have collapsed and is a concern :-(

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    1. I think it's partly due to luck and partly due to all the flowers there are to forage on here. Since we had 21 acres planted in wildflowers and native grasses, and the front fields in hay, the bees have been going bananas!

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  4. So cute!!!!!
    Have a delicious week!

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  5. Your posts always give me a smile. I so glad to hear that the honey is flowing in Canada!

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    1. I am so glad you enjoy the blog, Ms. Sparrow. ALways lovely to see your comments here, even though I've been terrible about responding lately!!

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  6. Love Button's smiley face :)

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  7. Jersey looks so content!
    Jane x

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    1. She is! SHe's a really sweet little pig, an excellent addition to the herd. She's fit in like she was meant to be here.

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  8. That is a LOT of honey! You must be exhausted. But what a fantastic harvest.

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    1. I have to say, it's been hard work this summer with all the lifting. My arms are very strong! I have about 30 or so honey supers left to extract before fall... but I am really pleased!

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  9. You're a big time operator with your honey bees.

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    1. And a delicious, Big Time Operator! I am looking forward to sampling this year's vintage. Knatolie, what do you do with all the wax from the used supers?

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    2. Well, mostly it's sitting around, waiting to get melted down in my solar melter! I'm a little behind. :)

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    3. Red, my mentor told me I could support 300 hives on this property with all the forage we have. NEVER GONNA HAPPEN! :)

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  10. Awww, I think I'm a little bit in love with Button!!
    Lorna ✿ naturally-bee.blogspot.co.uk ✿

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Thank you for all your comments, which I love to read!